tara

THE HOOPLA LITERARY SOCIETY

‘The other thing that annoys me about the debate is the shrillness of it… I don’t think that the statistics gathered by the Stella people, which are being gathered specifically for the purpose of setting up a women’s only prize, can be considered conclusive or meaningful…’

Cameron Woodhead, a critic for The Age and Sydney Morning Herald, as quoted in The Nose June 2012

 

Our Beautiful Literary Democracy

Is Tara Moss guilty of ‘privileged whining’ when she raises, again this week, the question of gender balance and bias in literary pages? When Tara Moss first blogged earlier this year about the VIDA statistics – that ...

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3 Comments

  • [...] ‘Is Tara Moss guilty of ‘privileged whining’ when she raises, again this week, the question of gender balance and bias in literary pages?…Surely an internationally successful writer has the right, and some might say the obligation, to speak out on an issue that affects all writers, male and female. Because if literary reviewing, criticism and award giving were an actual level playing field, being lauded and awarded for writing a great book would be more meaningful, not less.’ – The Hoopla Literary Society. [...]

  • Reply November 23, 2012

    ro.watson

    My understanding is that back in the 1970′s small womens’ presses saved womens’ writing and saved the publishing industry. Many of those small presses were taken over by large corporate publishers. I stand to be corrected. Anyway, a good book is a good book~ and I very much take Tara’s point about gender equity in press reviews.

    • Reply November 24, 2012

      Meredith

      Another interesting comment around this issue comes from UK writer, Ian McEwan, who is on the record as saying that without women readers the novel as an art form would be dead. Unless, of course, he meant that women readers only read novels by men, or only rated books written by men.
      If the novel is dead without women readers, why are literary pages full of reviews by men?

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