boys-vs-girls-powerpuff

BOYS VS. GIRLS? NOT BUYING IT

It’s not every day a cordial manufacturer gets the better of me, but trying to follow the logic of Cottee’s marketing and PR departments has left me wondering whether logic is now officially a mythical creature.

A few weeks ago Cottee’s announced a campaign called “Boys Vs. Girls”.

It’s a brilliant idea, especially if you like gender stereotyping your children. You can buy a blue cordial bottle with Boys written on it (for your be-penised offspring) or a pink bottle with Girls written on it (if your child was born with an innie instead of an outie).

I presume if your kids aren’t all of a ...

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76 Comments

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    ajay

    I was a bit late with this one…and saw one lonely bottle on the shelf of cottees yesterday one with the pink label on it the other day. In my annoyed by shopping with my usually delightful five year old haze didnt think to much about it… except for a quick thought of Im so out of the loop I totally missed another craze. Now I am pissed off in hindsight… I missed a opportunity to buy some dirt cheap cottees cordial! x peace out Corinne love reading your stuff!

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    Luke

    Corinne, usually love your work.. but you are making a big deal about nothing here. Yes, it is a stupid marketing ploy, but you are reading way to much into it.. calm down

    • Reply January 10, 2013

      Corinne Grant

      Luke and Rhoda: I think you missed the point of the article. It’s about the premise of pitting children against each other on the basis of gender, and Cottee’s fobbing off those criticisms by blankly and ludicrously claiming they’re not. It’s not about pink and blue toys per se. I was taking the piss out of Cottee’s lack of logic and their disrespect for their consumers. It’s spelled out quite clearly in the article. (If you only read the first and last couple of paragraphs, which are also called the introduction and the conclusion, it will hopefully become clear) And Luke, demanding that women who air an opinion should ‘calm down’ just makes you look like a bit of a tool. I was taking the piss out of Cottee’s–there’s jokes in there in amongst the argument–maybe that was what confused you. Or am I not allowed to take the piss either? Is that only for men? Should women who make jokes ‘calm down’ as well and shush up? If that’s the case, I don’t think this is the website for you…there’s a lot of women on here who refuse to ‘calm down’ and do what the menz tell them. I’m quite proud of the fact that I don’t ‘calm down’ and instead have made a career out of taking the piss, calling out hypocrisy, sexism and sheer stupidity for twenty years. As long as there are blokes like you telling me I shouldn’t do that, and that I’m reading too much into things (another way of telling women they’re a little bit hysterical and silly little ladies–giggle, giggle, giggle!!!) I’ll still have a career. Bless you for keeping me afloat. Keep it up–feminism needs you!

      • Reply January 13, 2013

        sb

        Well, Corrine, if your response to anyone who disagrees with you is to abuse them, put them down, and tell them to piss off because this site isn’t for them, then it isn’t for me, either. You do need readers to survive, don’t you? Perhaps demonstrating a little more acumen might get you a step closer to “obtaining equality”.

        • Reply January 13, 2013

          MsLarvik

          @Cath I’m with you I don’t and won’t buy the stuff!

    • Reply January 11, 2013

      Joni

      I agree!! That is a MASSIVE overreaction.

    • Reply January 13, 2013

      Dorre

      If you could demonstrate to your kids that they both taste the same (which I assume is the case – without the labels can they tell the difference?), it would be a good educational lesson to kids about the stupidity of believing advertising hype!!

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    Rhoda

    Who’s been checking out the cordial shelves lately LOL

    Lots ado… just another marketing ploy. No different to walking into Target and see lots of pink one side and lots of navy blue/army camouflage on the other or am I missing something.

    When we get pink and blue army tanks I’ll get worried.

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    VanEssa

    I’m just interested in knowing what happens at the end of this ummm erghh challenge? Is there going to be a huge advertising campaign lauding one sex over another? That will encourage harmony.

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    vanessay

    The most worrying part of this is that nobody involved in the company or at the ad agency even stopped to think that this campaign might be sexist.
    Where is The Gruen Transfer when you need it? You are right on this, Corinne, those who say it is just a marketing ploy miss the point. I am sure there where a thousand other ways that the company could have gone with their advertising. there is an ad around at the moment, I forget the product, where neighbourhood kids get together and build a giant waterslide, something like that would have gone down better here.
    A lot of money spent and no real thought involved.

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    Bunty

    Sod cottees. A marketing department of Neanderthals. Happy not to buy any more of their liquefied sugar. Luke, you’re patronizing and a dill. Love you Corinne. Don’t you dare calm down. Keep them coming.

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    Nat

    They are also all on the big displays this week at the super market so they are paying extra. But I’m a no name or a cheaper option anyway.

    It’s a stupid campaign.

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    Caz

    Implying that gender is a competition where there is a winner and a loser is divisive and sexist.

    Also, the campaign isn’t to get kids to play together, it’s to sell more product. They’re hoping that parents of both genders will feel pressured to buy two bottles of cordial instead of one, and the kids will compete with each other to finish their bottle first. The only winner in this showdown is capitalism. $$$

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    Rhoda

    Corinne, you’re right – wasn’t paying attention – sorry! To me it’s just cordial – probably bought 3 bottles in my whole married life and only to appease visiting children. I should have known you’d be onto something!

    But to address the issue raised – I can’t get heated up over it. Only mums and dads buy cordial and it’s up to them whether they buy into it. Although I suppose many might prefer the flavour and buy it anyway.

    I’m more worried about seeing girls punching and fighting like boys in the street and the school yard. Seems to me to be a recent phenomena. I’d be keenly interested in a discussion about that.

    • Reply January 10, 2013

      Corinne Grant

      I think the campaign to pit boys against girls and vice versa kind of feeds into your concern about violence in the playground. It’s the ‘smashed window’ approach–you let these seemingly little things slide (a company encouraging small children to compete with each other on gender) and the bigger things slide as well. If parents buy into the campaign, then their children are taught that competing and segregating on gender is valid and fun. You teach them this at an early age and it weakens the ability for them to grow up seeing all people as equal, irrespective of gender. I’d prefer a world where companies didn’t exploit that and kids weren’t exposed to it. It’s different to simply saying ‘pink is for girls and blue is for boys’–it’s a competition to find out which gender is better. Neither is better: what we want is equality.

      I’m not sure if there’s more violence amongst girls now than when I was a kid–there was plenty of it when I grew up! Then again, maybe I grew up in a rough neighbourhood!

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    Nat

    One of the big things I’ve noticed since having a baby (he’s now 3.5years) is how hard it is no to purchase big ticket items that are gender neutral. From rockers and bouncers to pink and blue prams, tricycles and bikes and toy kitchens they all seem to come in either a girl or boy colour – namely pink and blue. One family we knew gave us a green and blue trike their older children had used- their youngest was the first girl and was only 4 months older than our son and they has gone and purchased a pink version of the same trike.

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    Leigh

    Surely Cottees would have done better to pitch their campaign at concerns about little girls getting yucky boy germs if they didn’t get a ‘girls only’ bottle of cordial and vice-versa. :)

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    carole/m

    Corinne
    On the ball as always but it just shows how insidious sexism is in our society when informed women on this site don’t recognise it when they come up against it . These companies will disrespect you ( their customers ) as long as you allow them to . The only way to teach them is to withdraw your money , eg. don’t buy their products & you will see an immediate shift.

    Rhoda
    Surely , it’s not acceptable to see boys or girls fighting in the streets. It’s amazing to me that we have been conditioned to accept violence from boys & then expect them to change when they are older.

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    Carole

    I was surprised when my kids started (govt) school how gender segregated that is – right from the minute they start the day by lining up to go in by girls and boys lines. My boys happily played with kids of both genders until they started school and now insist that they can only have friends who are boys!!

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    ro.watson

    Apparently, not a lot of cordial in supermarket “cordial”….And I note it is “boys versus girls” on both types of bottle. So, girls are the defendants, and boys are the plaintiffs? Logic does not serve us well if the domain assumptions are wrong. Logic,like authority is something to be questionned.
    Anyway~thanks Corinne for pointing out what is not in Ribena. I have lately been straying into the cordial aisle,as a healthy alternative to what I currently drink, and I am truly appalled at what is in these “cordial” products.

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    jules

    It’s like the [recently] new lego for girls – it sucks. my kids (girls and boy) like the original lego, and I won’t buy or encourage any of the girls lego (which requires less imagination to assemble) on principle.

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    Jane

    I think it is a marketing ploy by Cottees so that families with children of both sexes have to buy one for each. I have 3 sons and a daughter, and I know full well that my boys would baulk at drinking from the ‘Girls’ bottle, because despite my best attempts, sexism is alive and well in their worlds. It just made me not buy Cottees at all.

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    Rhoda

    Carole, it’s not that I think it’s only unacceptable for girls to be fighting like ruffians but that there seems to be an increase in this sort of demented behaviour and it’s coming from girls. Not only that but they’re doing it like men – it’s not your old-fashioned ‘catfight’ any more.

    In fact I’m wondering if trying to make everything gender neutral confuses young people. That girls have rejected ‘ladylike’ or not been taught it so don’t recognize it. That’s it been replaced with what’s left and appropriating the masculine way of doing it.

    And of course that feeds into your point, Corinne. It becomes girl ‘power’ against boy ‘power’. Although I think most people would have a hard time seeing it in a cordial bottle! Clever Cottees. Must have done their research and think young mums will buy it. Bit of a worry really.

    Corinne, you can sure I will always take you seriously from now on!

    • Reply January 10, 2013

      Kate

      Rhoda, the 1950s just called….they want their attitudes back

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    Rasa

    Damn right, Corinne, shout on!

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    Amanda

    Thanks for revisiting this one. I emailed Cottees expressing my concern, in a polite and friendly fashion. Got nothing back. So I haven’t bought Cottees cordial since, and won’t again, I think. Their lack of acknowledgement of my concerns, and no response annoys me even more than the original campaign, I think.

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    carole/m

    Jeez Rhoda you’ve got me going again.

    “Ladylike” is a word I used to hear when growing up in the 50′s , it was used to prevent girls from competing , it was un-ladylike to be too good at anything ; the boys didn’t like getting beaten by a girl even then & that was just one of the barriers thrown in our way.

    I preferred to teach my daughter & my son to treat everyone with respect , courtesy & kindness.

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    ro.watson

    Onya Jules~as a kid, how I envied those boys toys~the trains, the chemistry sets~but maybe that envy was a driver for all kinds of later knowledge pursuits. Still, I would have preferred those toys sooner. One thing I did get which I loved was “Look and Learn” magazine. Another thing was some shells with their scientific classification names. Love my own tendency to the encyclopaedic so find dualsim~ like boys versus girls stupid. See how I departed from the topic,played, and came back!!

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    ro.watson

    Whoops~ meant “dualism”. My dad told me one of our ancestors on the paternal side was engaged in a dual and had to flee the country or he would be hanged, and after warring, ended up in Corinth, Greece where he met a lovely Christina, and then, via Turkey, they went to India and met Byron,the poet, and somehow,some people later, landed in Moreton Bay, Queensland. Just another story where cordial relations can be helpful.

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    Rhoda

    Carole I think we’re crossing channels here lol I absolutely knew that word ‘ladylike’ would get some takers. I have friends who won’t even acknowledge the word ‘lady’.

    Respect, courtesy and kindness is expected of everybody in this household – boy, girl, man, woman. ‘Ladylike’ infers – to me anyway – modesty – as in crossing your legs or keeping your knees together when your knickers might be seen. Nothing more, nothing less. Do women these days not care about that sort of thing?

    Next we be throwing out the terms boy/girl, man/woman because it encourages us to compete against each other on unequal terms – or something. Too silly.

    • Reply January 10, 2013

      IW

      “Ladylike’ infers – to me anyway – modesty – as in crossing your legs or keeping your knees together when your knickers might be seen. Nothing more, nothing less. Do women these days not care about that sort of thing?”

      I don’t know if women these days care about this sort thing Rhoda — do men? I doubt it. Why should they? Why should we?

      I think the point here is twofold — to divide the world into pink and blue or pink vs blue is harmful and unhelpful in so many ways, as Corrine has rightly pointed out. And as Corrine also correctly highlights, companies such as Cottees give a shit about how we feel about it. At the very best it is a lazy campaign.They do not deserve our business. And cordial is rubbish for you anyway. End of.

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    BB

    The concept is gross, yes, but am I disturbed that Corinne thinks that gay people don’t identify as either male or female, or that a small child is sexualised to the point that they understand if they are gay or not. It’s sad when adults put adult feelings and concepts on to small children.

    • Reply January 10, 2013

      Corinne Grant

      I really didn’t say anywhere that gay people don’t identify as male or female. I am genuinely appalled at that misrepresentation. I was saying that to lock boys into blue and girls into pink is gender stereotyping and kids should feel free to pick any colour they like. I also did not say children should be sexualised, anywhere at all in the article. There are some children who identify quite early on as same sex attracted–without adults forcing it upon them. Little kids have boyfriends and girlfriends in kinder–it doesn’t mean they’re thinking about sex. Yeesh.

      • Reply January 10, 2013

        Simone

        @Corrine,
        I also noticed the ‘Gay?’ commented and thought it was odd. I would assume a gay male would still identify as a boy (and want the blue one), and a gay female as a girl (and want the pink one).

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    ro.watson

    Oh girls~too much cordial. As for pink and blue~ gays got a pink triangle in the Nazi camps. Anyway, a lot has happened since and there was no homophobic crap in Corinne’s original article.

    Meanwhile, ” methinks the lady doth protest too much”(Shakespeare)~ can still be a helpful phrase, in all kinds of contexts, e.g today.

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    Sarak

    @Nat.
    My children are 9&12 so I haven’t had to look for baby’s stuff for quite a while.
    Until a few weeks ago when I went to buy some stuff for a friend who is having a baby. She doesn’t know the sex so I was specifically looking for gender-neutral stuff. Could not find a SINGLE THING! No greens, yellows, oranges, not even for non-clothing items. How much this has changed from when I had babies.
    When I mentioned it to the person working there, she told me I Was the third person to have commented on it that day!

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    ro.watson

    There are awful cordial colours which I would encourage any consumer to avoid because they do not in anyway reflect whatever fruits may have actually gone into them, if at all.

    Meanwhile, colour alert~ not every colour in this world is pastel, and nor should our palette be so limited.

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    aussieblonk

    well, this will be much better than using birds & bees during sex education talks. However, unless the pink bottle grows breasts and comes with knee pads, my 10yr son will not participate. If the blue bottle embarrasses me, as the statue of David often does, then again, no interest. Of course my 25yr old may already have a few under his bed…

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    carole/m

    Hi Rhoda,
    Well I’m happy with Woman & am modest & have never done the ” Sharon Stone ” ,although I am sometimes tempted to be that outrageous but ” Lady “, that’s something I’ve always resisted , It was always too restricting for me.
    Cheers

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    tmodster

    So if you are gay you are not a boy or girl???

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    Julie

    Girls have innies??? Not in my house
    (thought we were passed that particularly unhelpful representation)

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    Cordial is revolting

    Great article. Have you ever seen what happens to a little boy who gets beaten by a girl at something? Nothing – until the grown ups point it out what a miracle or surprise it is. It’s up to us to stop making it a big deal.

  • Reply January 10, 2013

    Cathy

    Thanks for another great article Corinne.

    On another note, Luke “calm down” = very rude.

  • Reply January 11, 2013

    Rhoda

    To clarify, just because I said the word ‘ladylike’ doesn’t mean I think girls should go back to the fifties. Sheesh!

    Just that I don’t use the term ‘ladylike’ as a perjorative. I grew up with ladies – one was my mother. I, on the other hand, have been a working ‘woman’ all my life, entering the work force in 1970 when there were still ‘ladies’ about and by the way, a lot of them knew a thing or two and achieved great things despite their corsets.

    Hard to be objective sometimes but I try to be and this is supposed to be a discussion isn’t it. So I’m discussing. Am trying to think it through objectively because Corinne has a point I think. History has a lot to teach us and even the fifties had its moments. It ended the emphasis on class division for one thing. But that’s another story.

  • Reply January 11, 2013

    Annie Also

    Last year I became a grandmother for the first time.
    I went shopping for Xmas pressies for my grandson.
    I stopped dead in my tracks when I looked up and found a division in a large shop, of BLUE signs ( BOYS TOYS) and PINK signs (GIRLS TOYS). I was gobsmacked. What happened to the 1970′s where we new mothers were demanding to cut out this sexist nonsense for babies and children???
    I wandered down the PINK aisles to see what was available. Dolls, pretend jewelry, colouring in books, fairy outfits, dresses for dolls, barbies, and dollies accoutrements. NO ‘educational’ toys at all.
    Walked down the boys section; filled with pirates outfits and swords, Star wars bits and pieces, farm animals, war toys, and educational bits and pieces ( blocks, leggo etc)
    I was shocked. I stood there and thought I was going to cry..had I stepped back in time to the 1950′s when I wanted a Maccano set, or a chemistry set, or a cowboy outfit but could not even ask, being a girl.

    I am so glad you are raising awareness again Corinne. But it is so exhausting to have to start all over again in trying to quieten down this divisive attitudes being fed to us by the “Market”.
    (BTW I got my 5 month old grandchild some sand play objects ..buckets, spade etc….NOT divisive by sex). So I will be the ‘old fashioned’ grandma and opt for books and educational play no matter the sex of this or any future grandchildren.

  • Reply January 11, 2013

    Thomas Brookes

    The battle of the sexes, will never be won, because there is too much fraternising with the enemy……..

    Now where did I put my pink tie?….lol

  • Reply January 11, 2013

    carole/m

    Rhoda,
    I had ladies in my family too , my Mother ( who desperately wanted me to be a Lady ). & my English born Great Aunts . They were humorous & intelligent women but there lives were controlled in varying degrees by society’s expectations & by men . My Father by the way was totally non violent & always had a half smile on his face , loved a joke .

    Luckily for me Rhoda I also had a Grandmother , on my fathers side , who , although she was born at the end of the 1800′s , played Golf , played Lawn Bowls , went out on Friday Night on her own to play cards , smoked , drank beer & SHE drove the family car most of the time .
    She was always overweight but she lived to be 96 years of age still mentally strong.

    Although nothing was ever said to me within my family I was obviously greatly influenced by all of these women.

    I always thought I had the ability to do anything & found that I could , as long as I didn’t allow society’s attitudes & male behavior & influence to interfere , this of course was not always possible but I learned many lessons from the failures & decided that I was always successful when trusting my own instincts & ignoring societal attitudes .

  • Reply January 11, 2013

    Blueblood

    Great article Corinne.
    I wonder how those who think you are over reacting would feel if, instead of “Boys Vs. Girls” the labels said “Rich Vs. Poor” or “Whites Vs. Asians” or “Religious Vs. Atheists”?

  • Reply January 11, 2013

    stephany panhuysen

    Thank you Corinne for maintaining your rage and sharing it. I personally think the only thing these companies/corporations etc. will respond to is grass-roots social media campaigns to boycott their company’s products till they lift their game.

  • Reply January 11, 2013

    Tanya

    I don’t buy cordial and only saw this recently in the supermarket. I was gobsmacked. I think it’s appalling marketing and I’m not even sure what the competition boys and girls cottees is promoting?

    Jules – I also find the pink and blue Lego frustrating. I loved Lego as a child and the girls Lego has less pieces and requires less imagination.

  • Reply January 11, 2013

    lydia

    Yes, look I agree with both points of view – overreaction? possibly… but I also do think that this sort of stuff is pretty awful, especially in an age where some men really don’t need any further encouragement to hate and denigrate women. Also, we do live in an age of gender-based violence towards women and also pay gaps etc etc ad nauseum.

    However, on the other hand, my 6yo daughter and her friends just love playing a game at school that they call ‘Punish the boys!!’ – it seems it basically revolves around forcing boys to play with (even look at!) fairy dolls etc.

    Yet the girls – especially my daughter, who always prefers pink to other colours – just love getting down a dirty with the boys, playing their (stereotypically) ‘masculine’ games. It doesn’t work the other way, and the boys really dislike being seen playing with dolls etc. So, go figure. Maybe there really is a genetic ‘gender war’ and Cottees amazingly fabulous and inventive advertising agency (not) has just tapped into it. LOL

  • Reply January 11, 2013

    lydia

    Oh yes, one more thing… My said daughter just saw the image at the top of this page and said: “That’s so silly!”. She doesn’t get it at all.

  • Reply January 11, 2013

    jeanie

    I am obviously not their target market – I mean, I look like their target market in all aspects – mum, kids in age range – except the whole willingness to push sugar products down my kids throats, so my say will be worth nothing to them.

    However, were I a patron of the cordial aisle, and I say a “Girls V Boys” campaign, do you know what I would do?

    I would buy the competitor’s cordial. Simple. I wonder if they are keeping statistics on what they are losing by such a stupid campaign.

  • Reply January 11, 2013

    ro.watson

    Oh Lydia~ your daughter is clearly innovative!!. I lived in a pink and white house(somewhat unusual), but was not colour bound as a kid. I loved “beating the boys”~ especially the bully boys. Arm wrestling was my forte. And for anyone who knows how to arm wrestle~ it is not all about sheer physical power.

  • Reply January 11, 2013

    MidnightBlue

    Transgender children? Any parent who decides that their child is transgender should be charged with abuse and lose custody. This is something that cannot be established until the child is well past puberty. Some parents are frightening in their stupidity.

    • Reply January 13, 2013

      Ella

      MB are you for real – if so, please get informed.

  • Reply January 11, 2013

    ro.watson

    MidnightBlue, somewhat speechless because I am not sure of my ground in relation to your comments. We are usually gendered from birth as we are sexed usually one way or the other~even when we have some ambiguity?

  • Reply January 11, 2013

    Helen Dunne

    Great article, Corinne. Not enough people thinking and speaking out in the manner that you do on such important topics.

  • Reply January 11, 2013

    Rhoda

    Gender identity is personal to the person concerned. We can’t know.

    You can be masculine or feminine regardless of your genitals.

    Transgender / transsexual – two different things.

    Worth remembering that gender is a social construct.

  • Reply January 11, 2013

    cathyfugue

    Whilst this is a terrible advertising ploy I do think it shows how desperately Cottees is trying to win back all those purchasers who stopped buying when they moved to the concentrate form. My husband is the main cordial drinker in our house but both he and the children agree that it is now undrinkable. We moved to another brand and the level of desperation shown by Cottees with this campaign suggests flailing around in some sort of marketing death throes.

  • Reply January 11, 2013

    Robyn

    Carole said: “On the ball as always but it just shows how insidious sexism is in our society when informed women on this site don’t recognise it when they come up against it . These companies will disrespect you ( their customers ) as long as you allow them to . The only way to teach them is to withdraw your money , eg. don’t buy their products & you will see an immediate shift.”
    I couldn’t have put it better myself. Why do women think male entitlement *starts*?? Why, at *home*, with this sort of artificial divisive BS, generated by marketers and blindly followed on by people who should be awake and realise what’s happening. As Carole said: it’s insidious. No one at any point hands male offspring an entitlement sceptre and says: “herewith you rule”…. it’s all this little rubbish that creates the unmanageable beast.

    C’mon – wake up, people. You decide your attitude, you create your future.

  • Reply January 11, 2013

    Gerry

    What a load of hoopla!!
    Firstly find some joy in your life, let us parents choose whats right or wrong for our children – if we/you have an issue don’t buy it, easy. The carry on in this article and the resultant responses from people is just plain ridiculous – a great example of the unnecessary hysteria in today’s journalistic world. What’s next boy or girl only kiss chasey? When did we all become so sensitive, when did we stop making decisions for ourselves, when did mediocrity become the new norm.

  • Reply January 12, 2013

    catecat

    Is there a price difference between the pink and blue versions? Perhaps the pink one should cost less, reflecting the growing gender gap in earnings…..

  • Reply January 12, 2013

    Leesa

    oh dear…we be such an opinionated bunch :). As usual love your work Corrine.

    It’s simple really. if we focus on things that divide us… genitals, beliefs, nationality etc…then we increase the likelihood of feeling more isolated, lesser than, not as good as, better than etc. None of these feelings are good for us.

    As such we hope the commercial world respects that and doesn’t feed in to such divisions.

  • Reply January 12, 2013

    ro.watson

    Three sexes~female,male and intersex. As far as I can tell “gender” is a more fluid concept on a continuum between feminine and masculine,and all the bits in between,but often gets attached to one’s sex.
    On the third layer, such concepts and realizations of sex and gender have power divisions attached by society,community and family.
    Versus?
    Silly duels which in no way elaborate the complexity of being human,are often reductionist, but meanwhile,as humans, we like to identify with those groups of people who provide us with a sense of meaning and connection with our full humanity.

  • Reply January 12, 2013

    Cath

    To me it’s simple….. don’t buy Cottees Cordial.

    • Reply January 13, 2013

      Ella

      Too right, rubbish product, rubbish marketing. Why does anyone still buy this stuff – whats wrong with water or dialluted juice on special occasions and as a bonus its genderless.

  • Reply January 13, 2013

    ro.watson

    I don’t mind coming out as “senstive”~ it is not a trait of weakness. I am sensitive to some preservatives, flavourings and colourings which are in cordial and other foods in a shopping aisle near you. Of course, I still have a sensitive nature in the inter-personal world too~ and again this is not a sign of weakness.
    As for normal/mediocre~ well that bell shaped curve indicates what many people do, think, and feel ~ which is why it is called “the norm”~because it is in the middle of that curve….

  • Reply January 13, 2013

    ro.watson

    meant “sensitive”….

  • [...] Corrine Grant gives us outrage over Cottees’ idea of a great ‘battle of the sexes’ competition. [...]

  • Reply January 14, 2013

    Tarcy

    Cordial is full of sugar. It shouldnt be on our shopping lists anyway. Give kids water!

  • Reply January 15, 2013

    sami

    I saw these bottles yesterday as the boyfriend had a sudden hankering for cordial (thankfully I hate the stuff). I cannot believe in 2013 we still have to break down all these gender constructs that society/corporations are imposing on people. It’s like the ‘mens’ and ‘womens’ gardeing gloves that Coles were selling recently. Or tv ads implying that men are useless at housework and ‘Aussie mums know best’. Sigh.
    Anyway I most certainly did NOT buy Cottees cordial and I never will. I never purchase brands that use such ridiculous advertising ploys. Don’t buy into them, and eventually they will go away.

  • Reply January 17, 2013

    Silvia

    Remember the catchy, highly successful “my dad picks the fruit” jingle? Starts to seem a lot less cute when you think of it as part of a pattern.

  • Reply January 19, 2013

    Lame Duck

    Wow, a game to see who can ijest the most sugar, How awesome!!!

  • [...] Picture from TheHoopla website [...]

  • Reply February 7, 2013

    John

    “Better drill that into your kids’ heads now, eh parents? Better get ‘em used to a world where the gender pay gap is increasing and men still rule the roost while they’re still young!”

    How do you get that, from these cordials being named? A typical feminist moron rant.

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