pete-evans

HAS EVERYONE GONE NUTS?!

Who cares about chef Peter Evans’ activated nuts?

Quite a lot of people, apparently, if you trawl through the news wires, the blogosphere, and Twitter today and see how many have been moved to make snide comments about the chef’s daily diet, as outlined in a Sunday newspaper here.

The host of My Kitchen Rules was asked by Fairfax Media to give an rundown of his diet, which included a high-maintenance line-up of health foods, including alkalised water, organic spirulina, cultured vegies, emu meatballs and the now infamous activated almonds.

The hashtag #activatedalmonds was trending at number one at lunchtime today.

According to the Courier Mail, ...

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47 Comments

  • Reply November 5, 2012

    Kelli

    Yes, there are waaay bigger news stories out there, and his dedication to healthy eating is very admirable. Seriously – I think we should all be making a bigger effort to make smarter food choices. He’s setting a fantastic example. It’s just difficult to read it and not laugh when wrestling with a busy job, a home to run and 2 small children. Fish fingers anyone?? Lol

  • Reply November 5, 2012

    AJ

    I’m with Kelli. I don’t think the point is that he eats well. Good on him.

    The point is that he’s supposed to be an ‘ambassador’ and yet he’s presenting as standard a diet that for most people is far beyond the capabilities of their time, let alone their money. The other reason that it’s seen as pretentious is because things that are perfectly fine (e.g. water) seem to need extra ‘improvement’ according to his diet (e.g. ‘alkalised water’). For those of us who have struggled just to get one or two servings of fruit and a bit of normal water into our diet, it can seem a ridiculously high pedestal to put your diet on. So it’s not that he’s doing anything wrong, it’s just that it seems so impossible as to make the idea of him being an ‘ambassador’ for average people a bit ridiculous. That’s just how I see it.

    Good on him for what he can do, but for the rest of us a plain glass of water is fine and for most people, they don’t need to make such drastic changes and put that much effort into their food in order to stay healthy.

  • Reply November 5, 2012

    Nicky Lavigne

    I was very surprised how much sh%t he copped. So many people eat so poorly and g-d forbid anyone tell them they shouldn’t feed their kids McDonalds.
    I blogged about it today http://www.thesublimeyou.blogspot.com

  • Reply November 5, 2012

    Alice Shaw

    When I read piece on Pete Evans’ diet I smiled a bit because I thought it was a joke piece. When I realised it was serious I smiled because it sounded a bit pretentious. Yes it did. It wasn’t the fact that he follows what he believes is the best possible diet for him, it was the fact that it sounded so far fetched as to be an unreachable dietary goal for the average person.

    I didn’t really read anything hateful (not saying that it isn’t there, just that I’ve not read it) and I’ve not made hateful comments but I was interested to read comments by some of his supporters who appear to be suggesting that anyone who has made a comment which isn’t fully supporting Mr Evans, is a person who feeds their children McDonalds three times a day. A bit of a leap! I absolutely support a healthy diet, and try and instil that in my children but because I didn’t even know what alkalised water and activated almonds were doesn’t make me a junk food addict leading my kids merrily down the path to type 2 diabetes.

    Finally, can I just say that Pete could have dealt with this a lot better by simply stating that as a chef and someone who is on a good salary (I’m assuming) he has both the means and the access to a diet that other people may not, and that he’s lucky he has that, instead of getting all huffy, and well.. pretentious about it.

  • Reply November 5, 2012

    Justin

    It’s a lot of pretentious moralising wank. Alkalised water with cider in it? Alkaline with added acid = neutral with a bit of salts left. Most of the crap he’s talking HAVE NO NUTRITIONAL BENEFIT WHATSOEVER. Drink a glass of frigging rain water and have a piece of homemade wholemeal toast, with some sprouts if it makes you happy. Give the $$ you saved to someone who needs it – Evans obviously has more than he knows what to do with. It was silly, self righteous and deserved a good old fashioned pisstaking.

    • Reply November 5, 2012

      The Huntress

      Ah, my thoughts exactly, Justin. I’m pretty serious about food – it’s my hobby as well as an absolute sensual pleasure. I love to invite friends around for dinner to share something I’ve made that’s hopefully delicious and interesting.

      But seriously, other than the fact I have no idea who this guy actually is, reading his list it is nothing other than pretentious, moralising wank (I have to steal those words, ’cause I couldn’t pick better ones). And seriously adding acid to alkalised water? Doesn’t take a genius to work that one out.

      A good healthy diet is not about sprouted millet or activated almonds or whatever bollocking crap is making the food trend rounds (and I’m usually very well aware of them). It’s about utilising good, unprocessed, fresh ingredients. You can’t go too wrong from there and it’s probably more delicious than sprouted millet and cacao nibs.

      For my dinner tonight – French Onion Soup. Onions (from local farmers) on the stove caramalising as I type. Herbs from the garden. Bread from the bakery (though I do make my own at times). Cheese from a dairy. My own stock.

      I do wonder though, that being that my soup is French onion, do my vegies count as being cultured?

  • Reply November 5, 2012

    Kirrilee

    Good on Pete! I think people just don’t understand and that is why they criticise. To get alkalinised water one needs an expensive filter thing but to do everything else he eats doesn’t sound that hard to me. My husband and I decided that we wanted a good diet for our family as one of the main priorities in life. We’ve had a kid in hospital so our diet has been pretty mainstream lately but generally I spend time making my own almond milk, soaking grains, making pastry from scratch with coconut oil and keeping the amount of processed food to a minimum. It’s not impossible, it is just a choice and requires lots of planning- having a kid with allergies gives us motivation too. We’re not rich, and we have 5 kids, and sometimes we have fish n chips and takeaway. But if anything, Pete’s diet inspires me to keep persevering to get back to where I want to be with diet.

  • Reply November 5, 2012

    Sly Place

    Come on, this guy is begging to be mocked. Alkalised water, activated almonds, cacao nibs, homemade coconut, carob, blueberry goji and the rest. Pretty much everything he eats or drinks reads like a send-up. You couldn’t make up comedy gold like this. If you want to consume what sounds to me a pretty unappetising diet (licorice and ginger tea?) go nuts (activated ones perhaps), but if you decide it’s wise to advertise this pretentious daily menu then don’t complain when people consider you, well, pretentious.

  • Reply November 5, 2012

    dramaqueen75

    oh – it really wasn’t a joke? I had no idea! Truly I thought it was one of the funniest things i had ever read. I honestly thought he was taking the piss out of the whole “day on a plate” genre.

    Oops

    • Reply November 5, 2012

      Alice Shaw

      You’re not the only one DQ, promise!

  • Reply November 5, 2012

    Stacey

    I really don’t care what he eats. If he enjoys what he eats and his happy with his choices then more power to him. He’s not hurting a soul. I am interested in the responses though. You can see how moralized diet has become. How you feed your children has become a reflection on your worth as a parent. Your weight defines your worth as an individual. If you eat cake you are making a “poor choice” and being “bad”.

    He’s also putting in a lot of effort on the basis of pseudoscience. There is no reliable evidence that there is a continuum with his diet sitting in the ‘best’ spot.

    I also love the ‘clean eaters’ this has flushed out of the woodwork. Note: The vast majority of people ARE NOT feeding themselves McDonalds 5 times a week. In fact the very best supermarket sellers are fresh meats and fresh fuit and vegetables. Many of us were ‘clean eating’ well before there was a term for it.

  • Reply November 5, 2012

    Nat

    Justin, that has been my point all day- they neutralise each other!
    Some times the people they get on that column just seem to be eating the fanciest food they can think of.

  • Reply November 5, 2012

    Kirrilee

    The number one selling item across Australia in supermarkets is actually Coca Cola.

  • Reply November 5, 2012

    Emily

    What a wowser the author is! I thought the activated almonds hashtag was hilarious on twitter last night. I didn’t read anything particularly nasty about Evans himself. Was just a bit of silliness about something that, let’s face it – was pretty silly. I don’t think this needs to be a discussion about healthy vs non-healthy diets. Lighten up! It was just a bit of fun.

  • Reply November 5, 2012

    Wendy Harmer

    Lucy’s right and so is Kamahl. I’ve seen a lot of people pile on in a very personal way who have turned around and apologised.
    If you’re on social media, you can’t have it both ways.

    Was on radio with Wil Anderson last week and his overriding sentiment: If you say something, be prepared to back it up. If you don’t have the conviction? Can’t defend your comment? Don’t say it.

  • Reply November 5, 2012

    Stacey

    Kirrilee – CC is the number one selling item by value – not by units. Apples and carrots don’t cost much. People are eating a lot vegetables than cans of soft drink.

  • Reply November 5, 2012

    Tracey

    The only thing more pretentious than Peter Evans’ excrutiating breakdown of his daily menu, was his quoting Schopenhuer as a response.

    He could have just said water, almonds, salmon, kale whatever, but he had to go on about the production.

    I think part of the mocking backlash is the personal identification by many people who eat ‘organic’ – people, we don’t care. Enjoy your organic nutrition, but stop trying to make it a religion – it’s annoying, boring and a bit sad.

  • Reply November 5, 2012

    muttering housewife

    It does come across as a bit religious, mine is the true way, miracles will come of it, hard to follow rules, you’re a little bit unworthy if you’re not doing it my way. I don’t mind discouraging that sort of thing. Did a bit of reading about the alkaline stuff, here’s a good link http://sciencebasedpharmacy.wordpress.com/2009/11/13/your-urine-is-not-a-window-to-your-body-ph-balancing-a-failed-hypothesis/
    also quackwatch is a good site.

  • Reply November 5, 2012

    Kyna

    Mr Evans is a food ambassador?

    If he is trying to reach people who want to move from an unhealthy diet to a healthier one, he needs to recognise that his daily list of unheard-of items could be quite intimidating to the people he is trying to connect with. He’s setting the bar too high.

    I’m seeing a huge disconnect between his daily diet, and that of the people he is supposedly an ambassador to

    I assumed it was a joke. Surely nobody serious about their role as a food ambassador would deliberately demonstrate how disconnected they are from the people they are trying to reach?

  • Reply November 5, 2012

    Cheez

    How does one activate an almond?

  • Reply November 5, 2012

    Jo

    I agree with Emily. First of all, I will admit I thought he was joking when I saw it. Every week, people on Twitter find amusement in the funny pretentious things people say they eat on My Day On A Plate. There are all sorts of cliches in there every week, including people claiming they have one small square of dark chocolate for dessert and ‘a cheeky red wine’ with dinner, or drink hot water with lemon in the morning. Some people probably really do those things. But the idea is o course, that you put your best foot forward when your daily diet is in the paper. Most people I read on Twitter were amazed because they had never seen anything like this, and didn’t know what most of the food was. That is funny, people. To me it looked like people making fun of something that sounded funny.

    No one is denying Pete the right to eat as he chooses! Or even to argue with people who disagree with his food choices. Activated almonds, cultured vegetables and alkalized water sounds funny. To me. You have the right to not find it funny.

  • Reply November 5, 2012

    Cowcakes

    Pete Evans is getting a well deserved ribbing for promoting bullshit nutrition. About the only thing that made any sense and nutritional validity was the emu meatballs, a tasty and lean source of high quality protein. The rest was quackery, pure & simple.

  • Reply November 5, 2012

    Jen Moon

    This is just a trendy young TV host attention seeking. I don’t believe anyone eats like that. Why would you?. Of course he has the right to eat what he likes. But if he carries on about it, he deserves what he gets. I thought he was good on TV but really, he’s just proven he’s an absolute tosser!

  • Reply November 5, 2012

    Darryl

    But…what the f@#k are activated almonds?

  • Reply November 6, 2012

    Tony W

    Human stomach produces hydrochloric acid to maintain pH around 1.5 – 3.5. That’s somewhere between battery acid and white vinegar. Alkalize that Evans, you tosser.

  • Reply November 6, 2012

    Jane Waterhouse

    Winter just gone, I had a nasty flu for 3 weeks that had worn me down and nothing I did (including a course of antibiotics) would shake it. Fed up, a friend of mine suggested I do a 5 day detox which contained many of the items on Pete Evans ‘quirky’ food list. I was skeptical but the truth is 5 days later my flu had gone, my skin was glowing and I had lost 2.5 kg’s. I couldn’t have kept it up longer that 5 days and I can’t say I wasn’t looking forward to some crusty white bread with melted cheese however I did not crave sugar for at least 4 weeks after finishing. Just sayin’.

  • Reply November 6, 2012

    Linda

    The basic message has never change. Eat fruit, vegetables, salads, minimal meat and try to drink water as your main beverage. Exercise enough to burn off more energy than you take in. Simple. All this superfood crap is ridiculous. People can have the odd treat. Might as well die early otherwise!

  • Reply November 6, 2012

    Maxabella

    It’s not really about Pete, is it? It’s sort of about the whole over-priced, over-it ‘health’ food industry when you think about it. Pete has just taken it to a whole new level. And it does bother me a little because why do that silly article in the first place – ‘my day on a plate’. WTF? x

  • Reply November 6, 2012

    Linda

    There is no doubt that diet is important. The problem with this whole superfood argument is that people grasp onto this rubbish like it is gospel. They think that by eating this stuff that they are somehow going to live longer,healthier lives than the rest of us. Some of the food that Pete is eating has been processed beyond its natural form. He would be better off eating the almonds and vegetables fresh rather than stuffing around with them. He would also be better off just drinking plain water as nature intended. I have known so many people who start diets like these and cannot stick to them.

  • Reply November 6, 2012

    Dee

    I am clearly in the minority here because I read that list of food he eats in one day and thought ‘oh that sounds interesting, wonder what that would taste like?. Maybe I could try that, etc’. I think that is actually the sign of a good ambassador. Not someone you have to slavishly follow in their every move, but someone who can give new ideas and supports and walks the talk on any issue. Nobody could say Pete Evans is not walking his talk, even if it is to an extent that most people are not necessarily going to want or be able to follow to the letter, and even if there are other options that are also sufficiently healthy (and likely cheaper!) as well.

    I certainly don’t eat the way Pete Evans does, although I would argue the food I eat is still relatively healthy, but I certainly didn’t feel the need to take him to task for what he eats. After all, we have sports ambassadors (former Olympians etc) aimed at getting kids and adults to be more active, and no-one says we have to win an Olympic gold medal – or they have to stop doing what they are doing – before they can say anything, or we can take anything from what they say.

    As for his use of Schopenhauer in his response, again, I’m impressed. I may not have Schopenhauer or any other philosopher’s words at the front of my mind most days, but I am always impressed when someone can find gracious or appropriate words at the right time. Seeing as all sorts of quotes seem to fly around the internet at the speed of light, it’s ironic that the use of a seemingly appropriate quote in this instance is derided as pretentious.

    It is interesting people can find so much to feel judged about and judge others about in a simple list of someone’s food intake (perhaps reflective of the moralising of food, weight and lifestyles, mentioned above). I hope one day for more openness and tolerance of diversity.

  • Reply November 6, 2012

    Cath

    My issue isn’t with the food per say … And its not with Pete either to be totally honest I don’t care what he eats and if he chooses to eat activated almonds, cultured veges etc good luck to him. My issue is with the fact that it says at the very top he is a Weight Watchers Ambassador.

    For the majority of us the cost and availability of much of what was on his menu is out of our reach and I believe he would have been better served saying he had homemade apple cider to start the day and then toast with tomato, avocado, mushrooms etc (I know that isn’t what he had), a homemade smoothie with fresh berries (frozen ones are better than no fruit at all!) etc you get my picture.

    If the people who are in a position of influence like Pete Evans and many other celebrity chefs want to actually make a change then they would be better served describing a healthy diet that the average person can afford and find at their local supermarket. I have a family of 5 one coeliac and two wheat intolerances in that mix so we have a very food aware diet we have to for the health of our children but this was beyond me. Not to mention the cost of a diet like this is actually out of reach for most average families.

    I did have a small issue with Pete however, and that was with his defence of his meal plan … why not simply say hey this is what I choose to eat different strokes for different folks. No, he chose (and many of his supporters chose) to insinuate that if we the average joe doesn’t eat a rich superfood diet then we are eating dead food and filling our diets with crap this is not the case for most families. Don’t assume that because I can’t afford to eat organic, activated, cultured food that I am not feeding my family whole foods, fruits, vegetables and a variety of homemade protein sources. I am not judging what you eat because frankly I don’t have the time between raising my family, working and keeping house (and remaining sane!) so please don’t judge me and assume that I am not looking after my family for making different (but still healthy choices) to you.

    Though I guess in many ways we the average joe only have ourselves to blame we have celebrity chefs because we have become obsessed with food related tv so you get what you deserve in many respects.

  • Reply November 6, 2012

    Anon

    Sorry, but please support our Aussie farmers. I would really like to know where most of this food was sourced, certainly not readily available in regional Australia. where’s the beef?? and um- flavour? That diet would just bore me silly! Thank god it’s only one day on a plate. I consider myself a bit of a foodie and am quite well known in my little town for it, I love almonds, but what is an activated one? And is alkalised water a glass of H2O with an alka seltzer in it? Am off to google!

    • Reply November 6, 2012

      Anon

      Sorry I see that the fish and eggs and veggies are most likely Aussie, but all that other stuff would be pretty rare. And there are certainly no emu farmers in my neck of the woods, I just have them strolling about in the paddock chewing on the wheat looking like glamour pusses with their long legs. I don’t think I could ever eat one!

  • Reply November 6, 2012

    Rivka

    I avoid sugar and processed food but this guy is a wanker.

  • Reply November 6, 2012

    Dee

    Also, I for one am happy when I hear people are eating organic chicken and eggs, seeing as the widespread use of antibiotics in conventional poultry rearing is thought to contribute to antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria (along with other causes in the general human population of course). We probably will all have cause to care about that someday soon. We should probably be caring mroe about that phenomenon right now.

    Again, I do not always eat organic food although do have some sympathy for the concept of less pesticides and chemicals in the production of that food (to have less in the environment and in food produced can only be a good thing, surely). I certainly don’t like the idea of the use of hormones and antibiotics in poultry.

    There are actually some things which affect us all, no matter whether we all care about them or not.

  • Reply November 6, 2012

    moorie

    Oh please even the nutritionist said it was over the top and there was no evidence to say that so called “live” almonds or whatever are any different to “dead” ones. Plus the water thing, I have drunk water from the tap in Sydney for 60 yrs and there is nothing wrong with it or me. Eat healthy, exercise and get on with it.

  • Reply November 6, 2012

    Tracy

    What a wank!

    I’m with The Huntress. I love good nutritious food – cooking is a hobby and a passion.

  • Reply November 6, 2012

    ro.watson

    I admire Pete for his energy and drive in getting these ingredients together~ no wonder he pulled funny tasting faces on”My Kitchen Rules”. His choices also say a lot about our general direction and education in popular foods. (I must stop ordering pizza).

  • Reply November 6, 2012

    DeeDee

    I’m with Justin, GIVE ME A SMALL BREAK!

  • Reply November 6, 2012

    Tony W

    “If you say something, be prepared to back it up. If you don’t have the conviction? Can’t defend your comment? Don’t say it.”

    So Wendy, how do you reconcile that with Evans’ promotion of alkalized water? I’d like to see him defend that! The fact is it’s a hoax, a flat out scam, and should not be promoted by a so called “food ambassador”.

    The rest of Evans’ diet may be obscure/esoteric, but at least it adheres to proven principles – high fibre, high organic content.

    • Reply November 6, 2012

      Linda

      @Tony W – I’m reminded a bit of the pretentious prattlings of Miranda Kerr and her gluten free birthday cake for her babys birthday. Now the child is not a celiac, so she has decided (like so many others) that gluten is bad without any proof of this at all. Gluten is bad for celiacs, but has no effect on non-celiacs. It is this holier-than-thou garbage that irks me. I don’t care what you choose to eat, but don’t push unscientific garbage onto the masses.

      • Reply November 6, 2012

        Benison O'Reilly

        Totally agree about the gluten-free rubbish. Catherine Saxelby, who is a qualified nutritionist and thus actually has the credentials to talk about these things wrote how gluten-free foods are often higher in fat and lower in fibre that their gluten- containing equivalents, not to mention being unnecessary for the vast bulk of the population.

        .

        • Reply November 7, 2012

          Cath

          Whilst this may be true for the general population I know from having to completely change the diet of three members of our family for medical reasons I simply don’t understand why ppl would opt for a “trendy” diet just because they can. I understand whole foods, and I even understand organic (if you can get good quality stuff it is great!) but I simply can’t get my head around choosing a different diet if you don’t have to for medical reasons. Being a coeliac and requiring Gluten free foods is an absolute nightmare and it isn’t as simple as cutting out bread and wheat gluten is so pervasive across a range of foods in our diets these days … Though that said I do wonder how much is actually necessary I think that the push back to whole foods (or clean eating as the trendy food push currently is!) can’t be bad because what I have learnt is that much of what I thought previously was healthy is not even what you could describe as food!

  • Reply November 6, 2012

    Tony W

    “don’t push unscientific garbage onto the masses.”

    I couldn’t agree more Linda. Being a good chef does NOT qualify people to give dietary advice. Celebrity chefs have a moral obligation not to peddle unscientific notions which are often potentially dangerous.

    Likewise celebrity athletes, eg. “This is a unique online opportunity to learn how to eat clean, healthy, simple meals…..Tap into my 40 years of insights and experience as an athlete, 25 years as a mother…”

    This from a woman who ate so much fish during pregnancy, as “brain food” for the developing foetus, that she wound up with mercury toxicity. I believe she miscarried several times before it was diagnosed.

  • Reply November 7, 2012

    Nat

    I watched “Jamie’s fifteen minute meals” last night. Impressively he gave the calorie count, used everyday food, even canned coconut milk to make food that looked yummy, appeared easy and was accessible. He also said they are balenced meals for four. It was just good honest food. I’m much more likely to cook something that was cooked last night over this sort of health food.

  • [...] Pete Evans: Has Everyone Gone Nuts?! [...]

  • Reply November 12, 2012

    Cate

    I suppose you’ll all be wondering what his crap looks like next. Who cares.

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